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Tag: fun of programming

Perl: Testing with Komodo IDE

When you write a Perl application with Mojolicious framework, you put tests into the t directory. Then it is very easy to run them because Mojolicious supports tests “out of the box” with test command that should run all tests one by one:

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Archive-Zip for Perl, a moody princess: limitations, shortcomings, workarounds

The Archive-Zip Perl module introduced as early as January 2001, then supported by several maintainers with regular updates. Most of the time Archive-Zip is alright, but there are limitations. 2016 is about to be over and the Archive-Zip still does not know how to handle newer “64bit” header ZIP format. Not only it cannot read them 64bit ZIPs; alas, it would not create those, also. With older “32bit” header ZIP archives compressing larger amount of data files presents a bigger challenge than it should. Yes, you might use a different compression format or technique. But what if we must stick with the good old ZIP file as our standard? Here is a recipe on how to handle that.

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Lack of context type for Perl hash arrays

Just some random thoughts on a napkin. Please do not shoot the messenger, but Perl would gain a lot in readability if it had reduced even more some of its generic constructs with better use of unambiguous context. For instance, who is in favor of a separate context type for hash arrays (associative arrays usually defined as %hasharrayname), please raise your hands.

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ProgFun is back

In about a month, on April 25, 2014, the next iteration of Functional Programming Principles read by Prof. Martin Odersky starts on Coursera. Regular college or university students contemplating participation should by all means follow their mentors’ advice. Mine is for those among seasoned and mature programmers, both professionals and amateurs, who have missed the opportunity to master functional thinking in their good time but are sharp enough to see their peers—who have had the chance—running circles around them intellectually.

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